Friday, April 14, 2017

A/C Time

The filter has been changed. Forecast for above 80 degrees today. Yep, it's that time. The A/C is coming on for the first time this season...well, maybe later today when I'm cooking.

Unfortunately, I cannot open the windows since the family struggles with allergy issues. Plus, I cut the front and back yard yesterday.

Remember, for yourself or your family members, after being outside during the pollen season for a significant period of time, the clothes we wear, yes, our hair and skin all collect pollen. If we do not take the time to change out of our clothes or take a brief shower, then we can transfer that pollen into the home, getting it on our pillows, furniture, and so forth.

Still, I love Spring. Soon, I'll be out there clearing out the garden, prepping the soil for planting my peppers and tomatoes along with some zucchini and yellow squash. Hey, my rosemary plant survived the winter for the first time in 3 years, or since I first started growing it in my garden. I still have to check on my thyme. I grow that one in a pot, but it came back last year, so, maybe it will come back again.

One other thing. My rain barrel will be operational by the end of the weekend. Hopefully, the showers we get will fill the 66 gallon reservoir, ready for dispensing come gardening season (right around the first Saturday of May).

MS

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Remembering the Palm Sunday Tornado Outbreak of 1965

View image on Twitter

Also, I provided an excerpt from Ohio History Central...
Click here.

The infamous twin twisters from the photograph above occurred in Dunlap, IN. I found a reference from the South Bend Tribune that includes a riveting, yet sad report of what transpired that day.

One of the famous quotes came from a weather observer from the U.S. Weather Bureau in South Bend when he said, "Reports of tornadoes and funnel clouds have become so numerous that it is impossible to keep track of them."

Read more from this reference here.

From the NCDC Storm Publication comes this excerpt from Ohio, in Lorain and Cuyahoga Counties....

This tornado was one of the most destructive of those occurring on Palm Sunday because it passed through a more populous section. It first touched down a short distance west of Pittsfield where it completely obliterated this crossroads community. Four people were killed in the ruins. It then proceeded east-northeastward just north of La Grange over the southern edge of Grafton and through Columbia Station and Strongsville. In each of these places there were additional fatalities bringing the total to 18. Property damage to homes, barns, and other structures ran into the millions. For example, 18 homes were leveled in Strongsville and 50 more were badly damaged along with two churches and a school building.
The arrival of the tornado occurred here shortly after 11pm, yes, a nightfall event. In fact, all 57 (according to NCDC Storm Publication) deaths in Ohio occurred after 9pm as these tornadoes pummeled the landscape.

The Palm Sunday tornado outbreak of 1965 will always be remembered, not just in Ohio, but the other 5 Midwest states as well, including Indiana who suffered the most loss of life that day than the other affected states.

MS






Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Dangerous Weather Today

Large hail and a few tornadoes are possible, greatest threat in central Kentucky, ground zero could be south central Kentucky.

CIPS analogs and SPC support the severe weather threat. Again, the potential is there. As always, a bust factor is involved.

Personally, in my opinion, this event has been well advertised. I do expect severe weather reports to be numerous today, with tornado and hail reports.

However, if the storms become severe to our south in Tennessee, this may limit overall severe coverage in Kentucky.

But don't rely on this. Always prepare for the worst and hope for the best.

This is a storm spotter day and weather radios should be on standby. Stay safe.

I am out of town but will be following the action throughout the day.

MS

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Severe Weather Chances

Well, a few days ago, this looked like quite the setup for a more widespread severe weather event. However, I've learned to wait and see if all of the 'ingredients' will be in place by showtime.

In this case, data as well as observation may be verifying that not all of the ingredients will be present after all. Instability will be hindered somewhat by clouds. The strongest energy resides north of the region.

I do think a Severe Thunderstorm Watch should be issued. But, a widespread event appears not as likely as once thought.

I am not going to say that the Enhanced region for severe weather is overdone by the SPC, I just think that the chances for a widespread event are going down. Yes, several warnings may be issued, but actual storm reports may come in smaller numbers this time around.

I believe the squall line will put out possible 40-50 mph winds. This will cause some tree damage and/or power issues. A sporadic gust above 50 mph is possible. Still, not a widespread event.

MS

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Welcome to the Spring Page...Sorry to Hear About Storm Chasers


Still have not fully loaded the Spring page, but updates are forthcoming.

Just wanted to take this opportunity to express my condolences to the families and the weather community over the loss of the storm chasers involved in a tragic car accident.

One storm chaser, Kelley Williamson, was a popular regular for The Weather Channel. I really enjoyed his video footage and reports.

I could not help but notice his rustic drawal when he would report on a storm he was chasing. His voice reminded me of Larry the Cable Guy.

Definitely will miss his enthusiasm and love for weather.

MS


Monday, March 20, 2017

MikJournal Monday 03/20/2017...Last Post For Winter Page

 

 

Well, it's that time of year. Right now I hear the birds singing and chirping. We have already 'sprung' forward to Daylight Savings Time. So, without further adieu, let's move on to Spring and forget about this most recent so-called winter.

Okay, you're right. Just one more post about this past winter. After all, it still may snow between now and summer, even here in Kentucky. It's not common, but not impossible either.

If you follow my blog, you will note a running total on the side of the blog with our regional seasonal snowfall amounts, which has been currently updated as of the 19th of March.

Whitesburg, in eastern Kentucky, came in at 9.0". The lowest was Bowling Green, which came in at 0.7". I should have included the northern part of our region, like the Covington area, in with the snowfall amounts, because Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky (or the Covington area) came in at 10.0".

Yes, it is possible other locations may have recorded a higher high and lower low than the ones I follow, but this is just a representation of how our region performed in terms of snowfall, which was puny compared to the last few years.

On the other hand, the mountains in the western U.S. and parts of the Northeast had a banner season for snowfall. I will be updating some seasonal totals as a tribute or farewell in a couple months or so. It's a lot of data. But, at least I won't have to include our totals 😌

How about this March, huh? Louisville has recorded 9 consecutive days of below normal temperatures. That's right. The month of March is below normal for the month, as of this writing. But, is that about to change?

Signs of Spring are back at the drawing table. After a disastrous spell of damaging cold to the young sprouts of early blooming fruit trees and other flowering plants, warmer air is poised to move back into the region. Still, a few hiccups of cold air will penetrate into our region, but overall, it's looking like an above-average trend will be settling in.

Here's a look at the current CPC outlook for April....



In addition, the rest of the month should average out above normal, again with a few hiccups of cold air. Moisture will be more abundant than what we have had recently as well. But, our days of recording any appreciable snowfall is dwindling.

Looking ahead to my Spring page, here's a glimpse of what you may see....



Total Reports = 188
Tornadoes = 12
Hail Reports = 11
Wind Reports = 165

And.....


Tornadoes
2017 2016 2015 2014 3-yr avg
Preliminary Actual Actual Actual Actual
JAN 141 - 17 28 4 16
FEB 115 - 102 3 42 39
MAR 111 - 86 11 20 38
APR - - 141 171 129 146
MAY - - 216 381 130 242
JUN - - 86 184 286 185
JUL - - 107 115 85 102
AUG - - 90 45 33 55
SEP - - 38 17 41 31
OCT - - 20 40 73 45
NOV - - 50* 99 23 63
DEC - - 18* 83 20 39
--- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
SUM 367 - 971 1177 886 1041


One more...

Tornado Deaths
2017 2016 2015 2014 3-yr avg
JAN 20 2 0 0 1
FEB 4 7 0 0 2
MAR 0 0 1 0 0
APR - 1 2 35 13
MAY - 2 7 0 3
JUN - 0 0 2 1
JUL - 0 0 4 1
AUG - 0 0 0 0
SEP - 0 0 0 0
OCT - 0 0 1 0
NOV - 5 0 0 2
DEC - 0 26 5 10
--- -- -- -- -- --
SUM 24 17 36 47 33
 
Come back and check out my Spring page, beginning soon. I will have severe reports, rainfall totals, drought status, record highs and lows, and so forth.
 
Have a good week.
 
MS



 
         
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Brief Weather News

Paducah, KY doubled its snowfall totals for the snow calendar year that runs from July 1 - June 30, from 0.2" to 0.4", after yesterday's whopping, shutdown amount. And you thought we, in central Kentucky have not had much snow.

Closing out February, Kentucky had recorded a total of 4 preliminary severe weather reports, even a confirmed tornado near Cadiz, in western Kentucky. Well, we've added to that over the last several days....



Total Reports = 186
Tornadoes = 10
Hail Reports = 11
Wind Reports = 165

Brutal weather atop Mount Washington, NH, home of the world's worst weather, as the claim goes. High temperature of -13 and low of -35 yesterday. If that wasn't bad enough, throw in an average wind speed of 78 mph and a gust of 115 mph! I bet there wasn't too many hikers there yesterday.

Good news for California....Their water year, which runs from October 1 through September 30, is off to a record start. The October - February period for statewide average precipitation came in at 27.81", the wettest first 5 months of the water year since at least 1900.

In addition, here is the March 7, 2017 drought report...

U.S. Drought Monitor forCalifornia

That's amazing when you compare that to last year's map on March 8, 2016...



Have a nice Sunday. March Madness is about to begin. Go Cats. Go Cards. Let's hope we don't have to play Northern Kentucky.

MS

A/C Time

The filter has been changed. Forecast for above 80 degrees today. Yep, it's that time. The A/C is coming on for the first time this seas...